Growing Nasturtiums

Aloha!

Nasturtium (Tropaeolum)

The flowers and leaves are edible and quite nutritious, and taste sweet and peppery with a pleasant fragrance.   Inspect for insects before eating!

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The plant is related to watercress – flowers and leaves make fun serving-platter-garnishes, additions to salads or other foods and decorations for cakes. 

Annual or perennial herbaceous flowering plants that seed quickly. The seedlings can have surprising color variations of yellow, orange, red, pink and cream flowers.

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Great additions to pots and flower beds because they trail down the sides of pots or twine up trellises or fences or spread on the ground, and fill in spaces with their colorful blooms and interesting fragrance.  

Planting Directions:

In Pots:  Plant seeds 1/2″ deep in potting soil; keep the soil evenly moist until the plants appear in 7 to 10 days.

In Ground: Cover your soil with light organic material as a mulch, about 1′ deep.  This is true whether you have clay or sand or something in between!  Plant the seeds about half an inch deep and 10 to 12 inches apart, in the soil, not in the mulch. Keep the soil evenly moist until the plants appear in 7 to 10 days.

Nature’s abundance is everywhere, and no where more apparently than inside of a tiny seed, which has potential to grow and multiply exponentially!

Nasturtiums are fun to grow, and here in Coastal Southern California, seeds can be planted in spring and fall.

Wishing you abundance, peace and Aloha!   🙂

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